StudyLink logoHome
Students on a university campus

Masters in Chemical Engineering in 2024

Highlighted course

Chemical Engineering MPhil, PhD

Swansea University United Kingdom

Find out more See all matching courses

Chemical Engineering Master Degree

University of Groningen Netherlands

Find out more

Chemical and process engineering MSc

University of Padua Italy

Find out more

Chemical and Materials Engineering MEng, MSc, PhD

University of Alberta Canada

Find out more

Chemical Engineering MEng

University of Sheffield United Kingdom

Find out more See all matching courses

MSc in Chemical Engineering MSc

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) Norway

Find out more
Search Masters in Chemical Engineering

Want to see undergraduate courses? See undergraduate degrees in Chemical Engineering

Don't meet the entry requirements for these courses? Learn more about pathway programme options.

Masters in Chemical Engineering

Study Chemical Engineering Masters Programmes

Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that is concerned with turning raw materials into useful products, for example food, drinks, metals, and beauty products. You will utilise chemistry, physics, mathematics and economics to use, transform and transport chemicals, materials and energy.

An undergraduate degree in chemical engineering will give you a foundation of knowledge in the area. You will study modules on material science, organic chemistry and physical chemistry, among others. Throughout your degree, you will develop your practical skills and theoretical knowledge, preparing you for employment.

Your degree will be delivered in a mixture of modes. These will include lectures and seminars, as well as practical and laboratory sessions. You may be required to take part in a work placement module or year.

Depending on where you choose to study, you may be able to specialise towards the end of your degree. This specialisation can influence where you choose to work after you have graduated. Common specialisations include:

  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Process Design
  • Plant Design
  • Polymer Chemistry
  • Raw Materials

If your degree required you to write a dissertation in your final year, this will give you an opportunity to further explore a favoured area of chemical engineering.

The accreditation of your chemical engineering course will depend on your institution, as well as the content of your degree. Typically, you can expect to be awarded a Bachelor of Engineering (BEng), or a Bachelor of Science (BSc).

In some countries, you may be required to gain professional accreditation before you are able to work as an engineer. Some degree courses are accredited or approved by a professional body of chemical engineering. Your institution will be able to provide you with more information about this.

Generally, an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering will take three to four years to complete. Foundation degrees, diplomas and certificates can last up to two years, when studied full-time.

Once you have successfully completed your degree, you can choose to either seek employment in your chosen area, or further your studies. Continuation of your studies could be in the form of a postgraduate degree, such as a masters or a PhD, or a graduate diploma or certificate.

The most common destination for chemical engineering graduates is working within jobs directly related to their degree. You might work as a chemical engineer, energy engineering and petroleum engineer. As well as this, you could work in the processing industries, managing and developing chemical processes.

If you choose to work within an industry not related to chemical engineering, you will be able to make use of your transferable skills. Skills gained include problem solving, project management, attention to detail, and research skills.

Sign up to StudyLink.com

Sign up to StudyLink.com, the home of quality study abroad advice.

Sign up now
Students with books and test tubes

International study advice

Find out more about the range of subjects that you can study at institutions around the world with our subject guides.

World map on a blackboard
Deciding to study abroad: The first steps

Read StudyLink's suggestions on your first steps when deciding where to study abroad, with helpful tips to make your decision easier.

Students throwing hats
What is a Pre-Masters?

International students finding it difficult to meet conditions of eligibility criteria can choose to enrol in pre-masters courses before applying for a masters degree programme.

Students reading a book
English Language Testing for International Students

Find out more about English language tests, your options and what is required as an overseas student.

Teacher at a whiteboard
How will studying abroad help your career prospects?

Read more about studying abroad, and how it can boost your future career prospects.

See more international study advice