Bachelor of Human Services (BHMS) (Child and Family) (Bachelor Degree)

University of Southern Queensland Australia

Cricos: 00244B

For more information about Bachelor of Human Services (BHMS) (Child and Family) at University of Southern Queensland, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
Bachelor Degree

How long you will study
years

Domestic course fees
AUD 18630 per year

How you will study
part-time

Course starts
find out

International course fees
find out

All study options

About Bachelor of Human Services (BHMS) (Child and Family) at University of Southern Queensland

Examine issues affecting families

If you are passionate about people, then our Bachelor of Human Services (Child and Family) will put you on the right path to working with your community. Combining a range of courses in psychology, education and counselling, you will examine the issues that impact families and children within our society.

This degree involves theory, field practicum, as well as work experience in a human services agency of your choice, providing you with the broad knowledge base and skill set needed to work in this field.

Career outcomes

This degree will provide you with a solid foundation to work in community organisations. You will be equipped to work in the government and public service sectors as well as in community organisations as a community development worker, counsellor, welfare advocate and support worker.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBachelor DegreeHow you will studyPart-timeHow long you will study find out
    Course starts find outDomestic course feesAUD 18630 per yearInternational course fees find out

Entry requirements for this course

Contact University of Southern Queensland to find course entry requirements.

Location of University of Southern Queensland

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