For more information about Law at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
LLM

How long you will study
12 Months

Domestic course fees
find out

How you will study
full-time

Course starts
find out

International course fees
find out

All study options

About Law at University of Kent

Location: Canterbury


Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, when it will be determined by the modules you choose.

January entry

It is possible to start the Kent LLM at Canterbury in September or in January. January entry allows students the flexibility to begin their studies without the need to wait for entry in September. Students who begin the Kent LLM on a full-time basis in January study over a period of 15 months. You study three taught modules in the first spring term and three taught modules in the autumn term. In your second spring term, you write your dissertation. Dissertation submission will be on the final day of the second spring term (usually in early April).

During the summer vacation, you are:

  • required to participate in an online module (Legal Research and Writing Skills)
  • encouraged to begin researching your dissertation 
  • required to attend the LLM Student Conference (in June)
  • encouraged to explore work experience and internships (where visa conditions permit)
Student view

Kent student Carolina talks about studying the Law LLM at Kent.


Duration

1 year full-time, 2 years part-time (September start); 15 months full-time, 28 months part-time (January start)

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the institutions and structures of public international law and the inter-relationships between them
  • the key concepts, policy issues, principles and relevant sources of law and policy
  • the substantive law relevant to a range of key areas of law and policy
  • the theoretical, social and academic debates which underlie the substantive areas of law
  • the practical contexts in which the law operates
  • the importance of evaluating public international law alongside its theoretical and practical contexts

Intellectual Skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • effectively applying the knowledge of law and policy to a wide range of situations where relevant practical or theoretical issues are under consideration
  • evaluating issues according to their context, relevance and importance
  • gathering relevant information and accessing key sources by electronic or other means
  • formulating arguments on central issues and areas of controversy, and the ability to present a reasoned opinion based upon relevant materials
  • recognising potential alternative arguments, and contrary evidence, to your own opinion and presenting a reasoned justification for preference
  • demonstrating an independence of mind and the ability to offer critical challenge to received understanding on particular issues
  • an ability to reflect constructively on your learning progression.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • an awareness of the limitations of present knowledge and matters needing to be resolved by further research
  • the ability to identify and characterise issues of law which arise in practical situations
  • the ability to research and access the main sources of law and policy which are relevant
  • the ability to appreciate and evaluate the main theoretical and political perspectives that underlie the legal provisions
  • the ability to provide a reasoned and justified opinion as to the possible legal consequences in particular circumstances
  • the ability to utilise research skills, at least, to commence further research into unresolved issues.

Transferable skills

You gain the following transferable skills:

  • the ability to identify relevant issues from potentially complex factual situations
  • the ability to undertake research from a diverse range of sources
  • the ability to summarise detailed and complex bodies of information concisely and accurately
  • the ability to formulate arguments in verbal presentations and defend these against opposing views
  • the ability to present information and arguments in written form, in accordance with academic conventions, and appropriately to the intended readership
  • the ability to evaluate personal performance.

This programme aims to:

  • provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to play a leading role in any field of law
  • provide a detailed knowledge and high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas
  • provide more broadly-based communication skills of general value to those seeking postgraduate employment
  • provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and particular contexts in which law operates
  • provide a degree of specialisation in areas of public international law of individual interest from among the wide range of LLM/PDip options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work which is at the frontiers of scholarship
  • encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the operation of public international law, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution
  • provide you with the skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in law and to encourage the production of original and evaluative commentary that meets high standards of scholarship (applies to LLM only)
  • encourage you to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts
  • develop your skills of academic legal research, particularly by the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions
  • assist those students who are minded to pursue academic research at a higher level in acquiring a sophisticated grounding in the essential techniques involved by following a specialised module in research methods (applies to LLM only)
  • contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of the past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardLLMHow you will studyFull-timeHow long you will study12 months
    Course starts find outDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

Full Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Full Time Overseas: TBC EUR | Part Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Part Time Overseas: N/A

Entry requirements

Contact University of Kent to find course entry requirements.

What students think about University of Kent

    Inspirational teaching - Patrique Tanque from Brazil is studying for a BSc in Forensic Chemistry.

    “Choosing Kent was an easy decision. The forensic programmes are ranked among the best in the UK and have a high graduate employment rate.

    “The teachers bring fresh ideas and up-to-date materials from real cases to enrich the lectures. They are keen to help out and always make sure we are getting plenty of support.

    “I was very fortunate to be awarded an International Scholarship, which meant I could dedicate myself to my studies.”

    Academic excellence - Stephanie Bourgeois from France is studying for a BSc in Biochemistry.

    “I like the approach to teaching here; academics are happy to answer questions and to interact with students. I find the lectures very motivational, they pique your curiosity and for me the exciting bit is going to the library and pursuing the things you are interested in.

    “The lecturers at Kent are excellent. You get to know them well and, as you move through the course, they are able to guide you towards projects, ideas or career paths that they think you will like.”

    Specialist research - Sally Gao from China is studying for a PhD in Electronic Engineering.

    “I have been very lucky with my supervisor, Professor Yong Yan, who is a world-class expert and the first IEEE Fellow in the UK in instrumentation and measurement.

    “Professor Yong Yan has helped me to become a better researcher. I am inspired by his novel ideas and constructive suggestions. Under his supervision, my confidence has grown through such milestones as my first set of experiments, writing my first research paper and attending my first conference.”

Videos from University of Kent

Location of University of Kent

University of Kent main campus is shown on the map below:

Read more about studying in the United Kingdom

Join Our Newsletter

×

Sign up to StudyLink.com today for free and be the first to hear about any new study abroad opportunities

Subscribe Now