International Migration (MA)

University of Kent the United Kingdom

For more information about International Migration at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
MA

How long you will study
12 Months

Domestic course fees
find out

How you will study
full-time

Course starts
find out

International course fees
find out

All study options

About International Migration at University of Kent

Location: Brussels


The MA in International Migration programme is suitable both for individuals who are finishing university and for those who have worked for some years and are seeking a change in career. It is equally suitable for those of you who have already worked with migrants or refugees. Our students typically come from all three groups and from around the world; you will learn not only from your lecturers, but from each other as well.

Your classes will be taught by academics and practitioners. You will learn relevant concepts, legislation and theories surrounding human trafficking, but you will also hear from a humanitarian worker who has worked in the Greek islands and made an initial determination of whether a migrant may potentially be a victim of human trafficking.

Learning the theory behind the phenomena will help you put your own work experience into theoretical context. If you are coming directly from university, you will gain the theoretical and empirical knowledge to draw on when you do enter the job market.

At the same time, the programme will give you a broad understanding of migration. Some of you will use your essays and dissertation to explore different areas of migration in more depth while others of you will focus your essays and dissertation on different aspects of one topic, for instance, refugee resettlement. You will situate your research within a broader base of migration studies.

In looking at states' reactions to refugee flows, you will understand that states receive not only refugees, but also family migrants, labour migrants and students and that citizenship and integration policies and philosophies have an impact on immigration policies as well. It is only through understanding the breadth of migration that you will be able to focus effectively on your particular topic of interest. This programme gives you the context in which to do just that.

This programme allows students to study migration – including human trafficking, asylum and forced migration as well as integration and citizenship. You can choose a secondary specialisation, while still focusing on migration studies. Students often study human rights law, development or international conflict analysis in conjunction with migration. Overall, you will gain an in-depth understanding of the broader field of migration while being able to focus on a particular topic from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Join us for an Open Evening

Come to our Brussels Open Evening on Thursday 13 February, 17.00-19.00 where you have the opportunity to talk to academics and current students. Book your place now.

Staff and students share their insights and experiences of the International Migration Master's.

Flexible study

We are committed to offering flexible study options at BSIS and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs. This programme is available with start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study options; split-site options, and students can combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines. 

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • key historical and philosophical issues in the development of studies of migration, together with familiarity with appropriate bibliographical sources
  • how to apply general theoretical and conceptual frameworks to the analysis of specific issues in domestic, regional, and international migratory settings
  • how to utilise qualitative and quantitative research methods and evaluate critically their application in scholarly literature and in policy papers
  • how to design and conduct a research project demonstrating awareness of epistemological and methodological principles appropriate to the subject of that research project
  • how to carry out an independent research project and write in a scholarly manner demonstrating familiarity with academic conventions
  • the nature of political, economic, social and technological problems, their emergence and dynamic.

Intellectual Skills

You develop intellectual skills in:

  • gathering relevant information and accessing key sources by electronic or other means
  • evaluating issues according to their context, relevance and importance
  • formulating arguments on central issues and areas of controversy, and presenting a reasoned opinion based upon relevant materials
  • recognising potential alternative arguments, and contrary evidence, to your own opinion and presenting a reasoned justification for preference
  • demonstrating an independence of mind and the ability to offer critical challenge to received understanding on particular issues
  • reflecting constructively on your learning progression
  • designing and writing a substantial scholarly paper demonstrating familiarity with academic and professional conventions.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the nature and significance of international development
  • the ability to appreciate and evaluate the main theoretical perspectives that underlie international development policy and the controversies surrounding it.
  • a critical understanding of the tools and techniques used to frame and measure the effectiveness and success of development projects
  • the ability to reflect critically on your own aspirations and ambitions in the intellectual and cultural context of development policy
  • the ability to critically understand the place and role of international development in the context of wider international politics, including issues of international political economy, security, migration, human rights, and the environment
  • an awareness of the limitations of present knowledge in the field and of the matters needing to be resolved by further research.

Transferable skills

You gain the following transferable skills:

  • communication: the ability to communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing (including, where appropriate, the use of IT), organise information clearly and coherently, use communication and information technology for the retrieval and presentation of information, including, where appropriate, statistical or numerical information
  • information technology: produce written documents, undertake online research, communicate using email
  • working with others: work co-operatively on group tasks, collaborate with others and contribute effectively to the achievement of common goals
  • improving own learning: explore your strengths and weaknesses, time-management skills, review your working environment (especially the student-staff relationship), develop autonomy in learning, work independently, demonstrate initiative and self-organisation
  • important research management skills include the setting of appropriate timescales for different stages of the research, with clear starting and finishing dates (through a dissertation), presentation of a clear statement of the purposes and expected results of the research, and developing appropriate means of estimating and monitoring resources and use of time problem-solving: identify and define problems, explore alternative solutions and discriminate between them.

This programme aims to:

  • provide you with a research-active learning environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of social science in general and migration in particular
  • offer a critical perspective of the interplay between migration and political, economic and social systems and processes
  • ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of migration in particular
  • ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of major theoretical approaches to migration, the historical development of contemporary migration, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field
  • ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for advanced assessment of contemporary problems in migration and their solutions
  • develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills).

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardMAHow you will studyFull-timeHow long you will study12 months
    Course starts find outDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

Full Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Full Time Overseas: TBC EUR | Part Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Part Time Overseas: N/A

Entry requirements for this course

Contact University of Kent to find course entry requirements.

Join Our Newsletter

×

Sign up to StudyLink.com today for free and be the first to hear about any new study abroad opportunities

Subscribe Now