Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) (BSc (Hons))

University of Kent the United Kingdom

For more information about Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
BSc (Hons)

How long you will study
3 years

Domestic course fees
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How you will study
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Course starts
September

International course fees
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All study options

About Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) at University of Kent

Our programmes are taught by leading researchers who are experts in their fields. The School of Computing at Kent is home to several authors of leading textbooks, a National Teaching Fellow, an IET (Institute of Engineering and Technology) Fellow and two Association of Computer Machinery (ACM) award-winning scientists. Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework*. This programme has full Chartered IT Professional (CITP) accreditation from BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. Our degree programme On this themed degree, the specific focus (here, Artificial Intelligence) is decided at the time of enrolment and named in your degree title. You can also study our general Computer Science degree, where a subject focus is decided during the course of your study. Our programme focuses on the technical aspects of computer science. You learn to code in several languages, starting with the Java programming language, which is widely used in industry across a range of applications including mobile devices. Building on these programming skills, you learn the principles and techniques that underpin the algorithms and systems shaping our world today. These include artificial intelligence, computer security, network technology, software engineering, and human-computer interaction. You put these principles and techniques into practice to develop software in a variety of ways, from small-scale exercises to a major software project. We also offer modules that allow you to gain practical experience. On our Kent IT Consultancy option, you learn how to become an IT consultant, providing computing support to local businesses while earning credits towards your degree.  You can also gain experience in teaching with our Computing in the Classroom module. This gives you the opportunity to apply your knowledge in a school setting. Year in industry Over half our students choose to take a year in industry after the second year of the programme. This gives you work experience, a salary and the possibility of a job with the same company after graduation.  You don’t have to make a decision before you enrol at Kent but certain conditions apply: for details, see Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) with a Year in Industry. Study resources Facilities to support the study of Computer Science include The Shed, the School of Computing's Makerspace, which houses: 3D printerslaser-cutting facilities development equipment, including Oculus Rift and Raspberry Pi.  Students also have exclusive access to a computer room and common room, and we run a peer-mentoring scheme. Extra activities Computer Science students often take part in TinkerSoc, a student-run 'tinkering' society which meets in 'The Shed', our collaborative workspace. TinkerSoc welcomes all students who like making things. Whether a member of TinkerSoc or not, you can spend time in The Shed, making, exploring and sharing. In this informal environment you can build physical devices for your coursework, as well as develop your own interests and hobbies. The School of Computing also hosts events that you are welcome to attend. These include our successful seminar programme where guest speakers from academia and industry discuss current developments in the field. We also host the BCS local branch events on campus. Professional network Our programmes are informed by a stakeholder panel of industry experts who give feedback on the skills that employers require from a modern workforce. Our successful year in industry programmes have allowed us to build up excellent relationships with leading companies such as BAE Systems, Citigroup and The Walt Disney Company. We also have a dedicated Employability Coordinator who is the first point of contact for students and employers. *The University of Kent's Statement of Findings can be found hereTeaching

Within the School of Computing are authors of widely used textbooks, a National Teaching Fellow and Association of Computer Machinery (ACM) Award-winning scientists. Programmes are taught by leading researchers who are experts in their fields.

Teaching is based on lectures, with practical classes and seminars, but we are also introducing more innovative ways of teaching, such as virtual learning environments and work-based tuition. Work includes group projects, case studies and computer simulations, with a large-scale project of your own choice in the final year.

Overall workload

Each stage comprises eight modules. Most modules run for a single 12-week term. Each module has two lectures and one to two hours of classes, making 14 formal contact hours per week and eight hours of 'homework club' drop-in sessions each term.

Academic support

We provide excellent support for you throughout your time at Kent. This includes access to web-based information systems, podcasts and web forums for students who can benefit from extra help. We use innovative teaching methodologies, including BlueJ and LEGO© Mindstorms for teaching Java programming.

Teaching staff

Our staff have written internationally acclaimed textbooks for learning programming, which have been translated into eight languages and are used worldwide. A member of staff has received the SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education. The award is made by ACM, the world's largest educational and scientific computing society.

Assessment

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-of-year examination and details are shown in the module outlines on the web. Project modules are assessed wholly by coursework.

The marks from stage one do not go towards your final degree grade, but you must pass to continue to stage two. 

Most stage two modules are assessed by coursework and end-of-year examination. Marks from stage two count towards your degree result. 

Most stage three modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and end-of-year examination. Projects are assessed by your contribution to the final project, the final report, and oral presentation and viva examination. Marks from stage three count towards your degree result.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

In stage three your project counts for 25% of the year's marks. 

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • hardware: the major functional components of a computer system 
  • software: programming languages and practice; tools and packages; computer applications; structuring of data and information 
  • communication and interaction: basic computer communication network concepts; communication between computers and people; the control and operation of computers
  • practice: problem identification and analysis; design development, testing and evaluation 
  • theory: algorithm design and analysis; formal methods and description; modelling
  • the philosophical and psychological principles of knowledge and cognition
  • machine intelligence: systems, algorithms and applications.

Intellectual Skills

You gain intellectual skills in:

  • modelling: knowledge and understanding in the modelling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the trade-off involved in design choices
  • reflection and communication: presenting succinctly to a range of audiences rational and reasoned arguments
  • requirements: identifying and analysing criteria and specifications appropriate to specific problems and planning strategies for their solution
  • criteria evaluation and testing: analysing the extent to which a computer-based system meets the criteria defined for its current use and future development
  • methods and tools: deploying appropriate theory, practices, and tools for the specification, design, implementation, and evaluation of computer-based systems
  • professional responsibility: recognising and being guided by the professional, economic, social, environmental, moral and ethical issues involved in the sustainable exploitation of computer technology
  • computational thinking: demonstrating a basic analytical ability and its relevance to everyday life.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in:

  • design and implementation: specifying, designing, and implementing computer-based systems
  • evaluation: evaluating systems in terms of general quality attributes and possible trade-offs presented within the given problem
  • information management: applying the principles of effective information management, information organisation, and information retrieval skills to information of various kinds, including text, images, sound, and video
  • tools: deploying effectively the tools used for the construction and documentation of software, with particular emphasis on understanding the whole process involved in using computers to solve practical problems
  • operation: operating computing equipment and software systems effectively
  • identifying and developing solutions for computational problems requiring machine intelligence.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in:

  • teamwork: being able to work effectively as a member of a development team
  • communication: making succinct presentations to a range of audiences about technical problems and their solutions
  • IT: effective use of general IT facilities; information retrieval skills
  • numeracy and literacy: understanding and explaining the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of a problem.
  • self management: managing one’s own learning and development, including time management and organisational skills
  • professional development: appreciating the need for continuing professional development in recognition of the need for lifelong learning.

The programme aims to:

  • provide a programme that will attract and meet the needs of both those contemplating a career in computing and those motivated primarily by an intellectual interest in computer science
  • be compatible with widening participation in higher education by offering a wide variety of entry routes
  • provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the principles of computer science
  • provide computing skills that will be of lasting value in a field that is constantly changing 
  • offer a range of options to enable students to match their interests and study some selected areas of computing in more depth
  • provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires students to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge
  • develop general critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of different computing and non-computing settings.
  • provide knowledge of key areas in artificial intelligence.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBSc (Hons)How you will study find outHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

Full Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Full Time Overseas: TBC EUR

Entry requirements for this course

Contact University of Kent to find course entry requirements.

Don't meet the entry requirements?

Consider a Foundation or Pathway course at University of Kent to prepare for your chosen course:

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