Architecture (BA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1)

University of Kent the United Kingdom

For more information about Architecture at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
BA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1

How long you will study
3 Years

Domestic course fees
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How you will study
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Course starts
September

International course fees
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All study options

About Architecture at University of Kent

Explore the relationship between people and spaces, and focus on how people want to live, work and relax in the 21st century. Our course provides a balance of theory, design work and professional experience. It’s not just about creating beautiful buildings; you'll lead on projects, solve complex problems and learn to communicate your ideas. Why study Architecture at Kent? Become a qualified Architect: Our course is accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and 93% of our Architecture graduates were in graduate-level jobs or further study 15 months after graduation (The Guardian University Guide 2022) Explore fantastic facilities: Our specialist spaces include modern design and dedicated model workshops, laser-cutting facilities, computer studio and digital hub, and a Digital Crit Space with 75-inch Clevertouch screens. Get career ready: Make important connections thanks to our links with architectural industry bodies and professional practices such as Farrells, Allies and Morrison, Purcell, Guy Hollaway, and Arup. Solve today’s biggest challenges: Sustainability is vital; our environmental impact will have repercussions for the future of the planet and the built environment. We've signed up for the United Nations 17 sustainability goals and these form part of every single project brief which you’ll be part of during your course.Learn from experts: Join world-leading researchers who teach architecture and the built environment. Get involved with industry professionals, local architects and projects, engaging with real-world ideas through mentoring schemes and placements.Join our community: Attend guest lectures, research seminars, exhibitions, conferences and symposia organised by the School or join the student-run Kent Architectural Students Association (KASA) and help organise social events, design competitions and the End of Year Show. Your course Our BA in Architecture is the first step towards qualifying as an architect. You study regeneration, sustainability, landscape, community and urban life and develop the practical design skills needed within the profession. In your second year, you have the opportunity to spend a term studying abroad. In previous years, students have studied at Virginia Tech in the US and École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture et de Paysage de Lille. In your final year, you continue to develop your knowledge and practical skills taking a module where you redesign an existing urban centre and culminating in your own architectural design project. You also undertake a dissertation. Based on our campus in the historical and architecturally diverse city of Canterbury, you will have access to excellent facilities to support your studies and research. Our specialist open-plan studios are at the creative heart of our teaching. They are a place where you can work develop your creative and critical ideas, experiment through models, drawings and digital representation as well as important architectural skills on projects, share ideas, inspire each other and begin to develop your personality as a designer. See the modules you'll study What our students say My time at Kent helped me gain skills learnt from presenting work and ideas in critiques. Often we, as architects, have a short period of time to convince potential clients that our idea or concept is the best solution to their brief. Crits are ultimately how we win new work! ‘Studio culture’ is also something that feeds into practice life, including learning how to work in an environment with your contemporaries, other professionals, and also with people that are experts in their own field. - Chris Gray, graduate and architect at John Pardey Architects. The lectures cover a wide range – everything from history to technology – so you could be learning about classic Greek temples one day and building ventilation the next. That’s when you realise how vast the subject is. You get a lot of information fired at you and it’s all about taking it in and choosing the things that are most appropriate to your design. - Edward Powe, current Architecture student.

We use a variety of learning and teaching methods, including lectures, workshops, studio-based work and field study trips. You also attend tutorials, seminars, small group discussions and one-to-one design sessions, giving you a range of feedback opportunities to improve their skills.

Our dedicated student workshop is run by experienced model makers and is equipped with a CNC router as well as a comprehensive collection of workshop equipment, laser-cutting facilities and access to an electronics workshop.

You also have the exclusive use of our digital workshop which enables you to explore aspects of 3D scanning, printing and modelling; using cutting-edge technology; from point-cloud 3D capture to fused deposition modelling 3D prototypes. We hold seven hobbyist 3D printers and three high-end 3D scanners, to enhance our experimental approach throughout the process and development of an architectural design brief.

Overall workload

You spend approximately 1,200 hours each academic year studying for your degree. On average, 60% of your time is spent in an activity led by an academic. The rest of your time is for independent study. Typically, this will involve design project work, reading, essay writing, technology and environment coursework. 

Your independent study is supported by excellent facilities including the library, architecture studios, architecture workshop, digital workshop and digital crit space.

Academic support

We offer a mentoring scheme in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), as well as practical involvement with local architects and projects. You also have access to academic advisors, academic peer mentoring, drop-in sessions, skills workshops and software specific workshops and training.

The University’s learning advisory service offers support and guidance to enhance your study skills.  Our student support service helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities or learning difficulties.

Teaching staff

Our School has an enthusiastic team of academic staff with many years of teaching experience at degree level, and strengths in historical, environmental, technical and digital aspects of the subject. Our lecturers are respected practitioners within the field and many are active researchers contributing to contemporary debates through their publications. Learn more by visiting our staff profiles.

Assessment

Assessment is by a portfolio of work, which includes design project coursework, written assignments and examinations, alongside research papers and technical reports. We place particular emphasis on sketchbooks and notebooks assembled over the academic year, which contribute to your own personal development plan.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The balance of assessment by examination and assessment by coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. Typical assessment breakdown:

  • Stage 1 – 15% exam, 85% coursework
  • Stage 2 – 15% exam, 85% coursework
  • Stage 3 – 0% exam, 100% coursework

Stage 1 assessments do not contribute to your final degree. Stage 2 counts towards 20% of your final degree and Stage 3 counts towards 80% of your final degree classification.

Find out more about how undergraduate courses work.

Feedback

You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance is available upon request from the module leader. In design-based modules, feedback is given throughout the year in design tutorials.

Knowledge and understanding

Stage One
  • The critical and contextual dimensions of architecture and design with respect to cultural, social, ethical, historical and theoretical considerations.
  • Design processes and the development of a design/architectural language.
  • The influence of environmental design technology on the production of a sustainable, safe and healthy built environment.
  • Structural and constructional principles, the properties and meanings of materials, and the ways that these may inform and influence design decisions.
  • The integrative relationship between space, structure, environment and materials.
  • The history of, and current debate about, design and architecture.
  • The verbal and graphical means of communicating design solutions to both professional and non-professional audiences.
  • The relationship between the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture, and architecture.
Stage Two
  • The breadth of architecture and design within its historical, cultural and social context.
  • Design processes and the development of a design/architectural language.
  • The influence of environmental design technology on the production of a sustainable, safe and healthy built environment.
  • Structural and constructional principles, the properties and meanings of materials, and the ways that these may inform and influence design decisions.
  • Cultural theory and modernism.
  • The verbal and graphical means of communicating design solutions to both professional and non-professional audiences.
  • The relationship between the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture and architecture.

Intellectual Skills

Stage One
  • Apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry.
  • Evaluate and research sources of information and evidence.
  • Synthesise information from a number of sources.
  • Apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a body of knowledge.
  • Utilise problem-solving skills.
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning design practice.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the legislative constraints and guidance on the development of the built environment.
Stage Two
  • Develop further the skills needed for academic study and enquiry.
  • Evaluate research and a variety of types and sources of information and evidence critically.
  • Synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice.
  • Apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge.
  • Utilise problem-solving skills to generate sophisticated design solutions.
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning design practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative constraints and guidance on the development of the built environment.

Subject-specific skills

Stage One
  • Understand creative design skills such as a consistent and methodological approach within a theoretical context.
  • An awareness of the advantages of collaborative working practices.
  • Test and analyse architectural and technical design options against developed briefs.
  • The ability to manipulate both colour and light to modify the character of space and surface.
  • An ability to plan in response to functional, spatial, aesthetic, technical and social requirements, within the scope and scale of a wider environment
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate verbally and graphically, using appropriate media and drawing conventions.
Stage Two
  • Understand creative design skills such as a consistent and methodological approach within a theoretical context.
  • Work both as a creative and imaginative individual and as part of a team within the area of architectural design.
  • Adopt a critical attitude towards the design brief.
  • The ability to measure, predict and analyse sound, light and thermal factors in buildings and to respond to them creatively.
  • An ability to plan both in the horizontal plane and in section in response to functional, spatial, aesthetic, environmental requirements, within the scope and scale of a wider environment.
  • The ability to use verbal and graphical means of advanced communication including physical models, computer and 3D drawings.

Transferable skills

Stage One
  • Research and consider sophisticated design problems in the light of contemporary criticism.
  • The ability to analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgements, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation.
  • Develop an ability to solve design problems and articulate solutions comprehensibly in visual, oral, and written forms.
  • An ability to engage in design thinking which is logical and imaginative.
  • Acquire independent judgement, critical self-awareness and ability to identify strengths and weaknesses. Ability to manage time effectively.
Stage Two
  • Research and consider sophisticated design problems in the light of contemporary criticism.
  • The ability to analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgements, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation.
  • Develop an ability to solve design problems and articulate solutions comprehensibly in visual, oral, and written forms.
  • An ability to engage in design thinking which is logical and imaginative
  • Acquire independent judgement, critical self-awareness and ability to identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • Ability to manage time effectively.

The programme aims to:

  • provide a broad education in architecture, primarily for those who will continue in architectural education and who will practice architecture
  • develop students’ intellectual, creative and imaginative powers within architectural design to the fullest possible extent
  • promote study of the practice and tradition of architecture within its social, cultural and environmental contexts, in order to develop knowledge and understanding
  • develop an understanding of the professional practice of architecture and in particular to develop and implement team skills
  • develop construction and environmental skills appropriate to architectural practice and to understand the influence of technology and the relevance of sustainability
  • promote the importance of an integrated approach to building design and to explore how an appropriate balance is achieved between competing demands
  • encourage a keen awareness of contemporary theory, technology and practice in order to provoke students’ creativity and innovation.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1How you will study find outHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

TBC

Entry requirements

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