Architecture (BA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1)

the United Kingdom

For more information about Architecture at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
BA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1

How long you will study
3 Years

Domestic course fees
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How you will study
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Course starts
September

International course fees
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All study options

About Architecture at University of Kent

It’s not just about creating beautiful buildings. At Kent, our design approach takes into account how people want to live and work in the 21st century, as well as environmental concerns. Kent School of Architecture and Planning has a forward-thinking philosophy and that means you have stimulating debates as well as developing your own creative ideas and practical skills. Our degree programme Our BA (Hons) degree is the first step towards qualifying as an architect. You study areas such as regeneration, sustainability, landscape, community, and urban life. You also develop the practical design skills needed within the profession. You are encouraged to be creative and experiment through models, drawings and digital representation – gaining confidence through your project work. We also arrange optional field study tours to complement your studies. In recent years, students have been to: France – Lille and Paris Spain – Barcelona Germany – Berlin Italy – Rome Austria – Vienna the USA – San Francisco and Washington DC.  (Please note that our field trips can involve extra costs that are not covered by your tuition fees.) Year in Computing You can take a Year in Computing if you are a current undergraduate student at the University of Kent, studying another non-computing degree programme. The Year in Computing is suitable for you if: you are interested in studying computing AND another subjectyou would like to get prepared for a career in techyou are interested in exploring the frontiers of another subject and computingyou want to learn how to be creative with computing. You can only apply for the Year in Computing once you are a student at Kent. Study abroad You have the chance to study abroad for a term in your second year. Previous study destinations have included: Virginia Tech (US) École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture et de Paysage, Lille. University of Tor Vergata, RomeIstanbul Technical UniversityIstituto Universitario Architettura Venezia, Venice Study resources Our open-plan studios are at the creative heart of our teaching. It’s a place where our students can work on projects, sharing ideas and inspiring each other. The Digital Crit Space provides a more formal environment for sharing work and getting feedback. They are also used to present finished work. Overall, our facilities include: modern design workshops dedicated model workshops laser-cutting facilities computer studio and labs digital fabrication tankDigital Crit Space for presenting designs, including uTouch HD screens an excellent library collection of books, journals and electronic resources. Extra activities Many of our students like to join the Kent Architectural Student Association (KASA). It is run by students and in previous years has organised: social events design competitions talks from experts in architecture, graphic design, product design and art. Kent School of Architecture and Planning also puts on special events that you are welcome to attend. These may include: open lectures research seminars exhibitions conferences and symposia. Professional network Kent School of Architecture and Planning has a wide professional network and invites guest speakers from inspirational practices such as: Farrells Carl Turner Architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Heatherwick StudioGuy Hollaway Architects.

We use a variety of learning and teaching methods, including lectures, workshops, studio-based work and field study trips. You also attend tutorials, seminars, small group discussions and one-to-one design sessions, giving you a range of feedback opportunities to improve their skills.

Our dedicated student workshop is run by experienced model makers and is equipped with a CNC router as well as a comprehensive collection of workshop equipment, laser-cutting facilities and access to an electronics workshop.

You also have the exclusive use of our digital workshop which enables you to explore aspects of 3D scanning, printing and modelling; using cutting-edge technology; from point-cloud 3D capture to fused deposition modelling 3D prototypes. We hold seven hobbyist 3D printers and three high-end 3D scanners, to enhance our experimental approach throughout the process and development of an architectural design brief.

Overall workload

You spend approximately 1,200 hours each academic year studying for your degree. On average, 60% of your time is spent in an activity led by an academic. The rest of your time is for independent study. Typically, this will involve design project work, reading, essay writing, technology and environment coursework. 

Your independent study is supported by excellent facilities including the library, architecture studios, architecture workshop, digital workshop and digital crit space.

Academic support

We offer a mentoring scheme in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), as well as practical involvement with local architects and projects. You also have access to academic advisors, academic peer mentoring, drop-in sessions, skills workshops and software specific workshops and training.

The University’s learning advisory service offers support and guidance to enhance your study skills.  Our student support service helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities or learning difficulties.

Teaching staff

Our School has an enthusiastic team of academic staff with many years of teaching experience at degree level, and strengths in historical, environmental, technical and digital aspects of the subject. Our lecturers are respected practitioners within the field and many are active researchers contributing to contemporary debates through their publications. Learn more by visiting our staff profiles.

Assessment

Assessment is by a portfolio of work, which includes design project coursework, written assignments and examinations, alongside research papers and technical reports. We place particular emphasis on sketchbooks and notebooks assembled over the academic year, which contribute to your own personal development plan.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The balance of assessment by examination and assessment by coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. Typical assessment breakdown:

  • Stage 1 – 15% exam, 85% coursework
  • Stage 2 – 15% exam, 85% coursework
  • Stage 3 – 0% exam, 100% coursework

Stage 1 assessments do not contribute to your final degree. Stage 2 counts towards 20% of your final degree and Stage 3 counts towards 80% of your final degree classification.

Find out more about how undergraduate courses work.

Feedback

You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance is available upon request from the module leader. In design-based modules, feedback is given throughout the year in design tutorials.

Knowledge and understanding

Stage One

  • The critical and contextual dimensions of architecture and design with respect to cultural, social, ethical, historical and theoretical considerations.
  • Design processes and the development of a design/architectural language.
  • The influence of environmental design technology on the production of a sustainable, safe and healthy built environment.
  • Structural and constructional principles, the properties and meanings of materials, and the ways that these may inform and influence design decisions.
  • The integrative relationship between space, structure, environment and materials.
  • The history of, and current debate about, design and architecture.
  • The verbal and graphical means of communicating design solutions to both professional and non-professional audiences.
  • The relationship between the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture, and architecture.

Stage Two

  • The breadth of architecture and design within its historical, cultural and social context.
  • Design processes and the development of a design/architectural language.
  • The influence of environmental design technology on the production of a sustainable, safe and healthy built environment.
  • Structural and constructional principles, the properties and meanings of materials, and the ways that these may inform and influence design decisions.
  • Cultural theory and modernism.
  • The verbal and graphical means of communicating design solutions to both professional and non-professional audiences.
  • The relationship between the disciplines of interior design, interior architecture and architecture.

Intellectual Skills

Stage One

  • Apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry.
  • Evaluate and research sources of information and evidence.
  • Synthesise information from a number of sources.
  • Apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a body of knowledge.
  • Utilise problem-solving skills.
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning design practice.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the legislative constraints and guidance on the development of the built environment.

Stage Two

  • Develop further the skills needed for academic study and enquiry.
  • Evaluate research and a variety of types and sources of information and evidence critically.
  • Synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice.
  • Apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge.
  • Utilise problem-solving skills to generate sophisticated design solutions.
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning design practice critically and initiate change in practice appropriately.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative constraints and guidance on the development of the built environment.

Subject-specific skills

Stage One

  • Understand creative design skills such as a consistent and methodological approach within a theoretical context.
  • An awareness of the advantages of collaborative working practices.
  • Test and analyse architectural and technical design options against developed briefs.
  • The ability to manipulate both colour and light to modify the character of space and surface.
  • An ability to plan in response to functional, spatial, aesthetic, technical and social requirements, within the scope and scale of a wider environment
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate verbally and graphically, using appropriate media and drawing conventions.

Stage Two

  • Understand creative design skills such as a consistent and methodological approach within a theoretical context.
  • Work both as a creative and imaginative individual and as part of a team within the area of architectural design.
  • Adopt a critical attitude towards the design brief.
  • The ability to measure, predict and analyse sound, light and thermal factors in buildings and to respond to them creatively.
  • An ability to plan both in the horizontal plane and in section in response to functional, spatial, aesthetic, environmental requirements, within the scope and scale of a wider environment.
  • The ability to use verbal and graphical means of advanced communication including physical models, computer and 3D drawings.

Transferable skills

Stage One

  • Research and consider sophisticated design problems in the light of contemporary criticism.
  • The ability to analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgements, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation.
  • Develop an ability to solve design problems and articulate solutions comprehensibly in visual, oral, and written forms.
  • An ability to engage in design thinking which is logical and imaginative.
  • Acquire independent judgement, critical self-awareness and ability to identify strengths and weaknesses. Ability to manage time effectively.

Stage Two

  • Research and consider sophisticated design problems in the light of contemporary criticism.
  • The ability to analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgements, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation.
  • Develop an ability to solve design problems and articulate solutions comprehensibly in visual, oral, and written forms.
  • An ability to engage in design thinking which is logical and imaginative
  • Acquire independent judgement, critical self-awareness and ability to identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • Ability to manage time effectively.

The programme aims to:

  • provide a broad education in architecture, primarily for those who will continue in architectural education and who will practice architecture
  • develop students’ intellectual, creative and imaginative powers within architectural design to the fullest possible extent
  • promote study of the practice and tradition of architecture within its social, cultural and environmental contexts, in order to develop knowledge and understanding
  • develop an understanding of the professional practice of architecture and in particular to develop and implement team skills
  • develop construction and environmental skills appropriate to architectural practice and to understand the influence of technology and the relevance of sustainability
  • promote the importance of an integrated approach to building design and to explore how an appropriate balance is achieved between competing demands
  • encourage a keen awareness of contemporary theory, technology and practice in order to provoke students’ creativity and innovation.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBA (Hons) - ARB/RIBA Part 1How you will study find outHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

TBC

Entry requirements

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