Sociology with Quantitative Research (BA (Hons))

the United Kingdom

For more information about Sociology with Quantitative Research at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
BA (Hons)

How long you will study
3 Years

Domestic course fees
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How you will study
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Course starts
September

International course fees
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All study options

About Sociology with Quantitative Research at University of Kent

The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research is one of the best in the country for teaching and research. Our academics are internationally recognised for their expertise and challenge you to develop your own opinions and ideas, encouraging you to become an independent thinker. We offer high levels of support and our staff are friendly and accessible. Adding a quantitative research minor to your programme opens your mind to new ways of thinking. Starting with no assumed statistical knowledge, you graduate with an advanced package of practical quantitative skills alongside subject-specific knowledge in sociological theory and its application to real world issues. Our degree programme This programme provides you with an understanding of core traditions and contemporary developments in sociological thinking and research.  In your first year, you take introductory sociology, and quantitative skills modules and can choose modules on subjects including criminology and modern culture.  In your second and final years, you extend your quantitative skills and take modules in contemporary sociological theory and social research methods. We offer an impressive range of optional modules, which gives you the flexibility to study the topics that really interest you. Our modules span many countries and include explorations of childhood, environmentalism, gender, political change, race, violence and work, among others. In your final year, you choose either a dissertation with a quantitative research focus or (providing you achieve the required academic standard by the end of Stage 2) a placement module where you can put your skills into practice.  Workplace experience is highly valued by employers, and the placements offered through Kent see students completing meaningful, applied quantitative analysis for business and organisations across a range of sectors, giving you the opportunity to add concrete workplace achievements to your CV. Sociology is also available as a single honours programme without quantitative research. For details, see Sociology. Year abroad Our students have the opportunity to spend a year or a term abroad at one of our partner institutions in North America, Asia and Europe. You don’t have to make a decision before you enrol at Kent but certain conditions apply.  Extra activities The Social Studies Society is run by Kent students for anyone with an interest in Criminology, Sociology, Law, Social Policy, Economics and Politics. Previous activities include the Criminal Justice in Action guest speaker series. There are events available throughout the year for students from the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. These may include: research seminars and webcasts career development workshops informal lectures by guest experts followed by group discussion.

In addition to learning through lectures, seminars, workshops, project supervision, and statistics classes, this degree prides itself in its aim to let students carry out hands-on research in the ‘field’ through placements and field trips. Most modules are assessed by examination and coursework in equal measure.

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • a range of key sociological concepts and empirically based arguments and data
  • the social processes that shape contemporary society and the relationships between individuals, group and social institutions
  • patterns of social diversity and inequality and their origins and consequences
  • the nature and appropriate use of diverse social research strategies and methods
  • how sociological knowledge can be used to evaluate social and public policy
  • the strengths and weaknesses of statistical techniques applied to the study of social issues
  • cross-disciplinary understanding of advanced quantitative reasoning and application of these methods to the analysis of complex societal problems
  • how to abstract findings from the application of quantitative research methods to examine essential features of complex societal problems and provide a framework for assessment of contemporary institutional arrangements
  • understanding of the value of comparative analysis across disciplines
  • understanding and awareness of ethical implications of social sciences’ inquiry.

Intellectual Skills

You develop the following intellectual skills:

  • effectively applying knowledge in analysing complex social issues
  • research skills, including the ability to identify a research question and to collect, manipulate, and interpret data
  • an understanding and appreciation of different theoretical positions and schools of thought within sociology
  • the ability to formulate and sustain a complex argument, which is supported with appropriate evidence
  • appreciation of a variety of normative and cultural positions
  • the appropriate use of analytical methods – including advanced methods – in handling, analysing and presenting statistical data across relevant disciplines; ability to interpret both research data and official statistics.

Subject-specific skills

You gain the following subject-specific skills:

  • the ability to communicate information and arguments
  • the ability to plan research
  • the ability to use and apply sociological theories and concepts in an argument
  • the ability to express and evaluate the value and ethical dimensions of sociological practice
  • the ability to reformulate social issues from the standpoint of sociological analysis
  • how to communicate quantitative empirical findings effectively across disciplines and audiences
  • how to construct criminological arguments using quantitative empirical evidence.

Transferable skills

You gain the following transferable skills:

  • utilising problem-solving skills in a variety of situations – seminars and projects
  • communicating effectively 
  • developing the ability to communicate theoretical and empirical material and arguments through written and oral modes, including use of illustrative and supportive material such as overheads and computer-aided presentations
  • developing further such skills as: learning and study skills, information retrieval skills, communication and information technology skills, group work skills and skills of time planning and management
  • engaging in group work
  • quantitative skills: the appropriate use of analytical methods – including advanced methods – in handling, analysing and presenting statistical data in diverse real-world settings.

This programme aims to:

  • produce graduates with analytical and knowledge based skills relevant to employment in the professions, public service and the private sector
  • develop new areas of teaching that are informed by current research and scholarship on key social issues
  • develop new areas of teaching in response to needs of the community
  • widen participation in higher education by offering various entry routes
  • provide a broad knowledge of the key concepts, debates and theoretical approaches that inform the discipline of Sociology
  • promote an understanding of contemporary social issues and of the impact of diversity and inequality on the local and national communities
  • provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions
  • develop problem-solving skills and an understanding of the nature and appropriate use of research methods used in sociological research
  • teach students key writing, research and communications skills
  • enable students to manage their own learning and to carry out independent research
  • provide students with the statistical and analytical tools to independently and successfully conduct advanced quantitative research
  • help students make persuasive arguments using quantitative research, and to critically assess the arguments made by others in the course of social life
  • help students link theoretical knowledge with empirical enquiry, so that they understand how to conduct and critique social research in the real world.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBA (Hons)How you will study find outHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

Full Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Full Time Overseas: TBC EUR | Part Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Part Time Overseas: N/A

Entry requirements

Contact University of Kent to find course entry requirements.

Don't meet the entry requirements?

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