Biomedical Science (BSc (Hons))

the United Kingdom

For more information about Biomedical Science at University of Kent, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
BSc (Hons)

How long you will study
3 Years

Domestic course fees
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How you will study
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Course starts
September

International course fees
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About Biomedical Science at University of Kent

In the School of Biosciences, we have a community spirit and students learn with and from each other. We are also renowned for our innovative teaching methods. New ways of using IT in lectures allow you to revisit the teaching at a later date.Our academics have developed animations to help explain tricky concepts.  Special communication projects teach you how to share scientific knowledge with the public. Our degree is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) and the Royal Society of Biology (RSB). Our degree programme During your studies you explore the biochemical processes that occur in the human body, learn how they respond to diseases and how this knowledge can be used to identify and treat diseases. In your future career, this scientific knowledge could be put to practical use within medical healthcare.  In your first and second years, you develop your skills as a bioscientist, covering areas including biological chemistry, genetics, molecular and cellular biology, human physiology and disease, and metabolism. In your final year, your modules cover areas such as immunology, haematology and blood transfusion, and pathogens. Optional modules cover areas including the biology of ageing, neuroscience and cancer biology.  You also complete your own research project. Our research funding of around £4.5 million a year means that you are taught the most up-to-date science and this allows us to offer some exciting and relevant final-year projects.  We also offer between 20 and 30 paid Summer Studentships each year. You can apply to work in our research labs during the summer holiday and gain hands-on research experience before your final year of study. Biomedical Science student Timo talks about his course at the University of Kent. Sandwich year  You can choose to take a work placement as part of your degree. For more details, see Biomedical Science with a Sandwich Year.  Year abroad You can choose to work or study abroad for a year. You are taught in English and previous destinations include universities in the US, Canada, Europe, Hong Kong and Malaysia. For more details, see Biomedical Science with a Year Abroad. Study resources We recently spent £2 million on our laboratories to ensure that you develop your practical skills in a world-class environment. We give you extensive practical training and you spend up to two days a week in the laboratory. Kent & Medway Medical School Kent is moving forward with the Kent & Medway Medical School (KMMS), due to take the first cohort of students in September 2020. The Medical School will be a significant addition to the University, with exciting opportunities for education and research in the School of Biosciences. Extra activities You can join BioSoc, a student-run society. Previous activities have included research talks and social events.  We also encourage our students to attend outside conferences and events. In 2015, Kent students competed with 280 teams and won the gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Giant Jamboree in the USA. Professional network Our school collaborates with research groups in industry and academia throughout the UK and Europe. It also has excellent links with local employers, such as: NHSGSKMedImmuneEli LillyLonzaAesica PharmaceuticalsSekisui DiagnosticsCairn Research Public Health England.

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, problem-solving sessions and tutorials. You have an Academic Adviser who you meet with at regular intervals to discuss your progress, and most importantly, to identify ways in which you can improve your work further so that you reach your full potential.

Most modules are assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and end-of-year exams. Exams take place at the end of the academic year and count for 50% or more of the module mark. Stage 1 assessments do not contribute to the final degree classification, but all stage 2 and 3 assessments do, meaning that your final degree award is an average of many different components. On average, 26% of your time is spent in an activity led by an academic; the rest of your time is for independent study.

Knowledge and understanding

You gain knowledge and understanding of:

  • the structure, function and control of the human body
  • the main metabolic pathways used in biological systems in catabolism and anabolism, understanding biological reactions in chemical terms
  • the variety of mechanisms by which metabolic pathways can be controlled and the way that they can be co-ordinated with changes in the physiological environment
  • the genetic organisation of various types of organism and the way in which genes can be expressed and their expression controlled
  • molecular genetic techniques and the causes and consequences of alterations of genetic material
  • the structure and function of the main classes of macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids and polysaccharides
  • the immune response in health and disease
  • the structure, physiology, biochemistry, classification and control of microorganisms
  • the main principles of cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and microbiology
  • the microscopic examination of cells (cytology) and tissues (histology) for indicators of disease
  • the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of analytes to aid the diagnosis, screening and monitoring of health and disease (clinical biochemistry)
  • immunological disease/disorders
  • the different elements that constitute blood in normal and diseased states (haematology)
  • the identification of blood group antigens and antibodies (immunohaematology and transfusion science)
  • pathogenic microorganisms
  • the main methods for communicating information on biomedical sciences.

Intellectual Skills

You gain the following intellectual abilities:

  • to understand the scope of teaching methods and study skills relevant to the biomedical science degree programme
  • the ability to understand the concepts and principles in outcomes, recognising and applying biomedical specific theories, paradigms, concepts or principles. For example, the relationship between biochemical activity and disease
  • the skills for analysis, synthesis, summary and presentation of biomedical information
  • to demonstrate competence in solving extended biomedical problems involving advanced data manipulation and comprehension
  • integrate scientific evidence, to formulate and test hypotheses
  • structure, develop and defend complex scientific arguments by understanding and applying your knowledge base
  • the ability to plan, execute and interpret the data from a short research project
  • recognise the moral and ethical issues of biomedical investigations and appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct.

Subject-specific skills

You gain subject-specific skills in the following:

  • to handle, biological material and chemicals in a safe way, thus being able to assess any potential hazards associated with biomedical experimentation
  • perform risk assessments prior to the execution of an experimental protocol
  • to use basic and advanced experimental equipment in executing the core practical techniques used by biomedical scientists
  • to find information on biomedical topics from a wide range of information resources and maintain an effective information retrieval strategy
  • to plan, execute and assess the results from experiments
  • to identify the best method for presenting and reporting on biomedical investigations using written, data manipulation/presentation and computer skills
  • awareness of the employment opportunities for biomedical graduates.

Transferable skills

You gain transferable skills in the following:

  • the ability to receive and respond to a variety of sources of information
  • communicate effectively to a variety of audiences using a range of formats and approaches
  • problem solve by a variety of methods, especially numerical, including the use of computers
  • the ability to use the internet and other electronic sources critically as a means of communication and as a source of information
  • interpersonal and teamwork skills that allow you to identify individual and collective goals, and recognise and respect the views and opinions of others
  • self-management and organisational skills
  • awareness of information sources for assessing and planning future career development
  • the ability to function effectively in a working environment.

The programme aims to:

  • instil a sense of enthusiasm for biomedical science, confront the scientific, moral plus ethical questions and engage in critical assessment of the subject material covered
  • offer an understanding of scientific investigation of human health and disease
  • provide a stimulating, research-active environment in which students are supported and motivated to achieve their academic and personal potential
  • educate students in the theoretical and practical aspects of biomedical science
  • facilitate the learning experience through a variety of teaching and assessment methods
  • give students the experience of undertaking an independent research project
  • prepare students for further study, or training, and employment in science and non-science based careers, by developing transferable and cognitive skills
  • develop the qualities needed for employment in situations requiring the exercise of professionalism, independent thought, personal responsibility and decision making in complex and unpredictable circumstances
  • provide access to as wide a range of students as practicable.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardBSc (Hons)How you will study find outHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course fees find outInternational course fees find out

Notes about fees for this course

Full Time UK/EU: TBC EUR | Full Time Overseas: TBC EUR

Entry requirements

Contact University of Kent to find course entry requirements.

Don't meet the entry requirements?

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What students think about University of Kent

    Inspirational teaching - Patrique Tanque from Brazil is studying for a BSc in Forensic Chemistry.

    “Choosing Kent was an easy decision. The forensic programmes are ranked among the best in the UK and have a high graduate employment rate.

    “The teachers bring fresh ideas and up-to-date materials from real cases to enrich the lectures. They are keen to help out and always make sure we are getting plenty of support.

    “I was very fortunate to be awarded an International Scholarship, which meant I could dedicate myself to my studies.”

    Academic excellence - Stephanie Bourgeois from France is studying for a BSc in Biochemistry.

    “I like the approach to teaching here; academics are happy to answer questions and to interact with students. I find the lectures very motivational, they pique your curiosity and for me the exciting bit is going to the library and pursuing the things you are interested in.

    “The lecturers at Kent are excellent. You get to know them well and, as you move through the course, they are able to guide you towards projects, ideas or career paths that they think you will like.”

    Specialist research - Sally Gao from China is studying for a PhD in Electronic Engineering.

    “I have been very lucky with my supervisor, Professor Yong Yan, who is a world-class expert and the first IEEE Fellow in the UK in instrumentation and measurement.

    “Professor Yong Yan has helped me to become a better researcher. I am inspired by his novel ideas and constructive suggestions. Under his supervision, my confidence has grown through such milestones as my first set of experiments, writing my first research paper and attending my first conference.”

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