Social and Cultural Research (MSc)

Brunel University London the United Kingdom

For more information about Social and Cultural Research at Brunel University London, please visit the webpage using the button above.

The award
MSc

How long you will study
1 year

Domestic course fees
GBP 4665

How you will study
full-time

Course starts
September

International course fees
GBP 10335

All study options

About Social and Cultural Research at Brunel University London

The degree is a valuable preparation and qualification for a career in social research. It is also formally recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)http://www.esrc.ac.uk/ESRCInfoCentre/index.aspx as meeting the requirements for training in PhD research in Sociology. This means that, on successful completion of the degree, you can pursue PhD work and apply to ESRC (subject to meeting residence requirements) for funding as a sociology research student in any UK university.Entry RequirementsNormally a good Honours degree from a UK institution relevant to social research; an equivalent overseas qualification or an equivalent professional qualification. Students whose first language is not English must have IELTS of at least 6.5 or equivalent Course AimsWhat does it mean to become a "researcher"? How do we learn the "craft" of social research? In what ways might social and cultural research be evaluated? Recent years have been characterised by a significant expansion of opportunities to undertake social and cultural research. Such an expansion has contributed to the call for improved research education and training. The aim of the degree is to provide a strong theoretical and practical introduction to the world of sociological, social and cultural research. You will be exposed to the range of general academic research skills and expertise expected of the professional researcher in the social sciences. The degree is a valuable preparation and qualification for a career in social research. It is also formally 'recognised' by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)http://www.esrc.ac.uk/ESRCInfoCentre/index.aspx as meeting the requirements for training in PhD research in Sociology. This means that, on successful completion of the degree, you can pursue PhD work and apply to ESRC (subject to meeting residence requirements) for funding as a sociology research student in any UK university.Course ContentTypical ModulesCore ModulesQuantitative Methods in Social and Cultural ResearchMain topics of study: design issues, correlational studies, hypothesis testing and inferential statistics; the design, validation and analysis of questionnaires; multivariate statistical techniques; analysis and critique of methodology in contemporary research.Qualitative Methods in Social and Cultural ResearchMain topics of study: developing research questions; research philosophies (positivism, phenomenology, reflexivity, feminist research); ethnography; interviews; focus groups; surveys and sampling; quantitative and qualitative data analysis; politics and ethics of research.Graduate Research Skills and Professional DevelopmentMain topics of study: reviewing research aims and objectives; choosing research methods; study design, sampling, and analytical issues in the use of such methods; appropriate resources for such studies; using information technologies; managing a research project, presenting research information.DissertationRecent examples of dissertations by students taking this course include: Blogging: a toll for student-centred learning in higher education? Discourse analysis of the British media texts related to euthanasia and old age. Veiling: second generation Muslim women and the crisis of multiculturism.ElectiveOne from:Global Media and Popular CultureMain Topics of Study: The clash of civilisations, the alternative media, national identity and the media, the digital divide., celebrity and popular culture, pornography, advertising, the cultural industries, media markets.Media AudiencesTheoretical approaches to media audiences, gender and genre: cross-national and 'subversive' audiences; Domestic technologies; media power and 'minority'readings; media production and audiences; television audiences and contemporary public issues (news and politics, health and illness, sexual violence); media effects/ influence debates; 'active' audience theory.The Information SocietyMain topics of study: the relationships between current transformations in the areas of new media communications and global governance; the interplay between new media, the public sphere, and processes of globalisation; the work of key information society and communications theorists such as Castells; the work of contemporary cultural and social theorists of global capitalism such as Hardt and Negri, Beck, Jessop and Urry. For further details, go to the http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/acad/sss/postgraduate/sociologyTeaching and LearningTaught modules are delivered via traditional lecture/seminar format together with workshops and group work.AssessmentAssessment is by coursework. Some of these are in a traditional essay format, while others allow you to complete projects or research exercises. A dissertation of approximately 15,000 words is completed over the summer period in consultation with a supervisor. You are encouraged to conduct primary research in an area relevant to the course in preparation for the dissertation.CareersThe course is designed to lead you to two kinds of subsequent career, depending on which one is of interest to you. First, it will prepare you for PhD study in sociology. The course is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), a status which will mean that you may apply for funding to this agency for your MRes and your PhD studies. These awards cover fees and living expenses for period up to four years. If you are interested in this route, you may like to contact potential PhD supervisors in the department. Follow this link to find out more about ESRC funding for your studies: Second, it will prepare you for a career in social research. There are many opportunities in this field. Social research in many subject areas (for example: health, education, social work, criminology) is done by government agencies, charities, academic institutions and others. The best way to find out about available UK jobs in social research is to examine job advertisements in the Tuesday or Wednesday editions of the Guardian newspaper. See also the web site of the Social Research Association: http://www.the-sra.org.uk

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardMScHow you will studyFull-timeHow long you will study1 year
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course feesGBP 4665International course feesGBP 10335
  • The awardMScHow you will studyPart-timeHow long you will study3 years
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course feesGBP 2330International course feesGBP 5165

Entry requirements for this course

Contact Brunel University London to find course entry requirements.

Location of Brunel University London

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