Law - General - LLM (LLM)

Brunel University London the United Kingdom

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The award
LLM

How long you will study
1 Years

Domestic course fees
GBP 5990

How you will study
full-time

Course starts
September

International course fees
GBP 10035

All study options

About Law - General - LLM at Brunel University London

The General LLM course allows students to choose from a range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property and international human rights. This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs. Further, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM should also be of great interest to overseas candidates.Entry RequirementsYou will normally be expected to have a second class undergraduate honours law degree or equivalent to be considered for admission. Relevant professional qualifications or experience may be considered adequate. If English is not your first language you will normally be expected to have a score of IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 585. Course AimsThe General LLM course allows students to choose from a range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property and international human rights. This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs. Further, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM should also be of great interest to overseas candidates. Students receive a good grounding in the legal concepts and principles operating in the areas of law chosen. They are given the opportunity to gain an understanding of areas of social and criminal justice policy where relevant and are introduced to areas of controversy in their selected areas of law and socio-legal studies.Course ContentThe LLM is normally awarded to students who successfully complete four taught modules of 30 credits each and a dissertation weighted at 60 credits (180 credits in total). The subject of the dissertation must be in a field related to one of the law modules taken by the student. Students who wish to undertake a dissertation involving empirical research are obliged to take the module in Social and Legal Research Skills.Typical ModulesCore ModulesDissertationAfter the taught modules have been completed in May, you will work on your dissertation under the supervision of a member of Law staff on a topic agreed between you and the Programme Director. This will provide you with an opportunity to deepen your understanding of a particular area of interest. The dissertation is due at the end of September.Elective ModulesFour from a selection that currently includes:Intellectual Property Practice and ManagementThe course will prepare students interested in pursuing a career in Intellectual Property Law or allied spheres for the challenges they will face when they enter practice. It will cover all major areas of practical knowledge needed in a competitive International Intellectual Property industry.International Trade LawThis includes the study of the law governing international contracts for the supply of goods, including the issues of transport, insurance, finance, arbitration, conflicts of laws, and international harmonisation of laws.International Economic LawThis includes the study of the law governing economic relations between states, and in particular the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and its rules on the supply of goods and services, tariffs, subsidies and dumping.International Intellectual Property LawThis course focuses on the European and international developments in Intellectual Property Law. It covers the national and international protection of Copyrights, Trademarks, Patents and sui generis rights. The module includes the study of WIPO treaties and TRIPS as well as European legislation.International Commercial ArbitrationThe main focus of the course is on the use of arbitration to resolve disputes arising out of international commercial transactions.International Labour LawThe international structures, standards and processes developed by the international Labour Organisation (ILO) concerning equality, health and safety, child labour, freedom of association and other aspects of social justice in the workplace.Fundamentals of Intellectual Property LawThe module aims to provide students with essential knowledge about the theoretical rationales and policy arguments for the recognition of intellectual property rights. Further, it seeks to explain the basic principles of Intellectual Property Law, the nature and scope of the rights covered, the procedures, both national and supranational, for the granting and recognition of the rights, the mechanisms for enforcement as well as defences against enforcement.Public International LawThis covers the law governing relations between states, including international personality, statehood and recognition, territorial sovereignty, immunity, the law of the sea, state responsibility, dispute resolution and the use of force and international human rights.European and International Environmental LawThis includes the study of the framework of environmental protection in the European Union and the relationship with market integration; the enforcement of EU environmental law; and WTO law on environmental protection as well as its relationship with EU law.International Finance LawThis module deals with the nature and function of banking, securities, and financial markets. It also covers European and international legal regulation of financial markets, as well as the role of international financial organisations.Intellectual Property and New TechnologiesMain topics of study: copyright; trade marks; freedom of expression and the protection of IP looking at issues relating to the use of protected works and trademarks in boycott campaign for example or in defamation on and off line.Development and Enforcement of International Human RightsTheory of international human rights law; origins, development and sources of international human rights law; the United Nations human rights regime; the Council of Europe regime for human rights protection; the European Union and human rights; the OSCE and human rights; the inter-American system of human rights protection; the African system of human rights protection; Asia and human rights; civil and political rights; social, economic and cultural rights; racial discrimination; women’s rights; labour Rights; challenges and potential new directions for international human rights law.International Humanitarian LawProvides a detailed overview of international humanitarian law in context; studies and assesses the principles and rules relating to the protection of individuals, during armed conflict, means and methods of warfare, as well as the rules pertaining to protection of the environment and belligerent occupation; examines the implementation and enforcement of international humanitarian law; and discusses critically current developments and challenges for international humanitarian law.International and Comparative Criminal JusticeComparative criminal justice thinking; comparative research; the essential elements of pre-trial and trial criminal procedures in common law; the effects of the internationalisation of criminal law upon human rights enshrined in International Conventions and the ECHR in particular; criminal justice developments after September 11 and the possible impact of the terrorist threat upon human rights ideology in criminal justice.International Human Rights Law and Islamic LawStudents will examine the diversity within the Sharia principles and approaches towards human rights: think critically about the overall relationship of the Sharia with modern international law and human rights law; examine the role and relationship of Sharia with several of the controversial subjects within human rights law – these include the Sharia and women’s rights, the Sharia and Child rights, Islam and family law, Islam and minority rights, Islam and the prohibition of terrorism; critically examine the issue of reform and greater compatibility of the Sharia with human rights values.International Criminal LawA detailed overview of international criminal law within public international law context and its relationship to international human rights law; international criminal law and its basic principles, concepts and methodologies as well as the sources and methods of research in the field; the evolution of the concept of international crime and how international crimes violate human rights; the role played by the United Nations and its subsidiary bodies in the development of international criminal law; the implementation and enforcement of international criminal law; current developments and challenges for international criminal law.Collective Security LawThe concept and development of international collective security; the role of law in collective security; the UN collective security system; alternatives to UN enforcement action; collective security outside the UN; defence, security and sub-regional organisations; case studies; questions of doctrine and practice; factors that affect the effectiveness of collective security the future of collective security.Note: modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion.Teaching and LearningThe teaching usually takes the form of classes, involving discussion of prepared reading, supplemented by lectures from the module teacher to introduce and consolidate the discussion. Use of WebCT, our online learning environment, will also help reinforce learning. AssessmentTaught modules are assessed by essay and examination.Dissertation After the taught modules have been completed in May, students taking the LLM will work on their dissertations. The subject of the dissertation must be in a field related to one of the taught law modules taken by the student. This will provide an opportunity for students to deepen their understanding of a particular area of interest. The dissertation is due at the end of September.

Study options for this course

  • The award How you will study How long you will study Course starts Domestic course fees International course fees
  • The awardLLMHow you will studyFull-timeHow long you will study1 year
    Course startsSeptemberDomestic course feesGBP 5990International course feesGBP 10035

Entry requirements for this course

Contact Brunel University London to find course entry requirements.

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